The importance of winter

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This topic has 16 voices, contains 24 replies, and was last updated by  mollyl 2217 days ago.

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mick
December 15, 2007 at 9:28 pm

mick
December 15, 2007 at 9:28 pm

Many ecosystems DEPEND on winer cold and weather. with out the cold and permerfrost many insects and vermin would become over populated and then they would destroy their ecosystem. Cold winter weather is a balancing act. Most people curse the cold weather but they should, they just dont relize how our agruculeral system is dependent on it. like i said a few senteces ago buts and vermin would became to populated and would destoye or crops and feilds.
Not all ecosystems are depednt on this check and balnce system but alot are and with out it society and nature in thso areas would be doomened


reverend-blair
December 16, 2007 at 12:42 am

The pine beetle infestation in British Colombia is a good example of the importance of cold weather, Mick. There have always been pine beetles, but extended cold snaps kept their numbers down. Now it doesn’t get as cold and doesn’t stay cold for as long, and the beetles are wiping out massive tracts of forests. The dead trees then create a fire hazard.


canadian
December 16, 2007 at 3:47 am

As well the winter melt helps the Ducks, geese and other animals by flooding wet lands.

Look at how the Peace/Athabasca Delta has been negatively effected since the 2 and now maybe a third dam were put on the Peace river. Egg Lake has all been vanished due to this and only filled up twice since and now is a marsh.


workinman
December 16, 2007 at 1:52 pm

Many ecosystems DEPEND on winer cold and weather. with out the cold and permerfrost many insects and vermin would become over populated and then they would destroy their ecosystem

i agree mick!
nature is the most awesome example of ‘balance’. it is amazing how species adapt to fill niches and surpluses.. nature left alone is a beautiful harmony of an ever changing, ever evolving dance. but unfortunately, man can never seem to leave nature alone… we are always interupting the ‘flow’ or ‘balance’
even winter, as much as some of us despise it, is part of the dance… and VERY necessary!


mick
December 16, 2007 at 5:24 pm

i agree mick!
nature is the most awesome example of ‘balance’. nature left alone is a beautiful harmony of an ever changing, ever evolving dance. but unfortunately, even winter, as much as some of us despise it, is part of the dance… and VERY necessary!
Loved the dance analogy, I think it works Very well, when i was oringaly writing it was thinking of the 3 branches of the goverment! But a dance is less corupt and its a flow were evry step and move you do is parryed by your dance partner! and the song can be compared to the ecosystem as a whole… but yeah analogys for the win


horselover
December 17, 2007 at 12:30 am

Winter’s great, but too much can be a bad thing.

We have so much snow outside from only 2 major snowfalls, it’s more than last year combined already. This will cause a major problem when the snow starts to melt, the storm sewers are going to be flooded.

I just shovelled a foot and a half of snow from a driveway, snow combined from the last snow I would think, but I doubt it as it’s a new house, and the car had been in an out prior to the storm.

I’ll post some pictures of the snow tomorrow, you’ll see how much we got since last night.


mick
December 17, 2007 at 12:32 am

Iv goten mad snow down her in jersey to (its still snowing) But i did not think of the socoligcal aspects of winter more along the lines od how it effects the env and how that effect society


horselover
December 17, 2007 at 8:29 pm

It’s bad for the environment right now.

Case in point, the crash that involved 25 vehicles just after noon today that forced a major highway to close down.

link


3plus3
December 18, 2007 at 12:13 pm

I have not gotten any snow. I remember when I was a child we would always get snow at least once or twice ( I mean a really good snow) every winter. Haven’t had a really good snow here since about 93-94.


tag
December 18, 2007 at 1:21 pm

I like snow, but wouldnt like a long winter. It’s nice to know that it’s a check on pesky insects.


tater03
December 18, 2007 at 2:13 pm

I really needed to be reminded of this at the moment. I am sitting here freezing thinking how I hate the winter. But it is nice to be reminded why we need to have it. Just wish we didn’t need so much snow.


mick
December 18, 2007 at 4:58 pm

I really needed to be reminded of this at the moment. I am sitting here freezing thinking how I hate the winter. But it is nice to be reminded why we need to have it. Just wish we didn’t need so much snow.

Im glad to have helped remind you. Im not even a winter fan…im a summer child……but its best to see beautiy in all things.


debrajean45
December 27, 2007 at 9:40 am

I wonder, there’s been a lot of publicity lately about the honey bees and where have they gone? Do you think the changing weather patterns have a lot to do with that?


Simon Wareing
January 7, 2008 at 3:25 pm

Where have the bees gone?

As it stand right now there are no answers better than speculation going on as to the fate of honey bees. One fact that is not often recognized is that without bees we are done. I am shocked that the scope of the die off doesn’t rate more than a passing headline when the implications are humungous.

“There are several unusual things about the phenomena and one common factor that cannot be attributed to be the direct cause but may be an “aggravating other conditions” factor and that is temperature fluctuations. No single cause drought chemicals/pesticides, mites, bacteria, a fungus or virus seems to be common to all the events or even indicated as a cause in any single event. Extreme weather and temperature fluctuations seem to play a major role stressing the bees and weakening their immune systems.
There are no bee bodies; they simply all disappear, all adult bees are simply gone, sometimes leaving a queen and a few young hatched workers. This is unheard of, since normally a bee colony will do almost anything to protect its queen.
The hive is left intact, with capped cells of honey and bee bread.
Another unusual factor is that bees sensing a dying colony nearby aren’t going in right away and killing the other bees and robbing the hive of honey, like they usually do for example when the bees have died of parasites or disease.”

There are several unusual things about the phenomena and one common factor that cannot be attributed to be the direct cause but may be an “aggravating other conditions” factor and that is temperature fluctuations.
No single cause drought chemicals/pesticides, mites, bacteria, a fungus or virus seems to be common to all the events or even indicated as a cause in any single event. Extreme weather and temperature fluctuations seem to play a major role stressing the bees and weakening their immune systems.
There are no bee bodies; they simply all disappear, all adult bees are simply gone, sometimes leaving a queen and a few young hatched workers. This is unheard of, since normally a bee colony will do almost anything to protect its queen.
The hive is left intact, with capped cells of honey and bee bread.
Another unusual factor is that bees sensing a dying colony nearby aren’t going in right away and killing the other bees and robbing the hive of honey, like they usually do for example when the bees have died of parasites or disease.

There are several unusual things about the phenomena and one common factor that cannot be attributed to be the direct cause but may be an “aggravating other conditions” factor and that is temperature fluctuations.
No single cause drought chemicals/pesticides, mites, bacteria, a fungus or virus seems to be common to all the events or even indicated as a cause in any single event. Extreme weather and temperature fluctuations seem to play a major role stressing the bees and weakening their immune systems.
There are no bee bodies; they simply all disappear, all adult bees are simply gone, sometimes leaving a queen and a few young hatched workers. This is unheard of, since normally a bee colony will do almost anything to protect its queen.
The hive is left intact, with capped cells of honey and bee bread.
Another unusual factor is that bees sensing a dying colony nearby aren’t going in right away and killing the other bees and robbing the hive of honey, like they usually do for example when the bees have died of parasites or disease.

link

I wonder, there’s been a lot of publicity lately about the honey bees and where have they gone? Do you think the changing weather patterns have a lot to do with that?

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